Blog posts written by RLA staffers

Adaptations: Enabling a sustainable supply of private rented options

This post sets out the experiences of landlords trying to meet the requests of tenants and would-be tenants who are seeking homes which are adapted to the needs of the elderly of disabled. The post concludes by finding an opportunity for local authorities, the voluntary sector and private landlords to work together. This could be an opportu nity to use licensing revenues constructively and raise the PRS offer to particular groups of residents. 

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Landlords & their sparing use of Section 21: The evidence is clear & consistent

This post reviews a range of landlord surveys which have investigated their use of Section 21. Despite the range of samples, methodologies, and repsonses in these studies a consistent pattern emerges. A typical landlord rarely uses Section 21. When they do so, it reflects frustration with alternatives.

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REPOSSESSION WAITING TIMES: TOO LONG TOO OFTEN

With Section 21 on the way out, a landlord's only means for taking possession of property is through the Section 8 process. This article details how waiting times for repossession have been too high over the last 10 years, showing no real signs of improvement. Regionally a similar pattern emerges, progress is scattered and inconsistent.

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THE WAIT OF JUSTICE: THE SLOW PACE OF THE COURTS IN GREATER LONDON

Between 2010 and 2019 over half the courts in England and Wales were closed. The government announced investment of £1bn to improve on-line facilities and make the court process more efficient. Have these reforms worked? This is the first of a series of blogs in which the RLA examine access to justice in the PRS.

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Landlords shine brightly…but energy efficiently

This deep dive into the 2019 Quarter 3 survey reflects on the landlord community's investment in pushing up the energy efficiency of their properties. With much more needed to be done, there is a clear case for a mechanism to bring forward investment and move energy efficiency in the PRS still closer to wider government objectives.

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Scottish tenancy reform: Some positives with more to follow?

The RLA teamed up with the Scottish Association of Landlords (SAL) to give landlords and letting agents in Scotland a chance to give their views on the recent tenancy and possession reforms introduced by Holyrood. The system is new, there are concerns but there are clearly elements of the new system which are welcomed. However there is still much to do before landlords would agree the new system could be considered "a success".

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Rent controls – evidence says “no”

Across Western Europe and North America there is continued interest in applying rent controls in the Private Rented Sector (PRS). The RLA has looked at the experience of rent controls in Europe and the USA. Rent control policies where they exist have not slowed down rent growth - indeed the opposite may be true.

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Capital Gains Tax & the PRS – negative impacts on the property market

Research from the RLA reports on the impact of Capital Gains Tax. CGT traps landlords into holding property longer than planned, the tax and, in doing so, holds back a functioning property market. The tax reduces property investment as well as the volume of properties available to purchase.

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Universal Credit and Landlords – some solutions for persistent roll-out problems

The 2019 Q1 State of the PRS report focuses on the roll-out of Universal Credit and the imapct it has had on landlords. The majority of landlords report that Universal Credit claimants do go into arrears, despite claims to the contrary.

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